This Bookshelf: 2019 Books
Links to All Steve Hopkins’ Bookshelves
Web Page
PDF/epub/Searchable
Link to Latest Book Reviews:
Book Reviews Blog
Links to Current Bookshelf:
Pending and Read
2019 Books
2019 Books
Links to 465 Books Read or
Skipped in 2018
2018 Bookshelf
2018 Bookshelf
Links to All Books from 1999
through 2018 Authors A-M
All Books Authors A through
M
All Books Authors A through
M
Links to All Books from 1999
through 2018 Authors N-Z
All Books Authors N through
Z
All Books Authors N through
Z
Book of Books: An ebook of
books read, reviewed or
skipped from 1999 through
2018
Book of Books
This web page lists all books reviewed by Steve Hopkins at http://bkrev.blogspot.com during 2019 as well as books pending (The Shelf
of Possibility) or relegated to the Shelf of Reproach or the Shelf of Ennui. You can click on the title of a book or on the picture of any
jacket cover to jump to amazon.com where you can purchase a copy of any book on this shelf.
Key to Ratings:
*****
I love it
****
I like it
***
It’s OK
**
I don’t like it
*
I hate it
Title (Click on
Link to purchase
at amazon.com)
Author(s)
Blog
Date
Comments
Click on
Picture to
Purchase at
amazon.com
Merchants of
Truth: The
Business of News
and the Fight for
Facts
Abramson, Jill
4/19/19
Subscribe. Former New York Times
executive editor Jill Abramson has written a
great account of the disruption of the news
media, a book titled, Merchants of Truth: The
Business of News and the Fight for Facts. She
understands this business from the inside and
has gained perspective from the outside to
assess what all this turmoil means for
American life. Many people are losing faith
and trust in a free press. Readers who value
journalism should read this book and then
subscribe to another high-quality newspaper
in your town or someplace else.
Training School
for Negro Girls
Acker, Camille
3/26/19
Range. I enjoyed the range of experience
represented in the characters in each of the
stories in the debut collection by Camille
Acker titled, Training School for Negro Girls.
The situations, mostly set in the District of
Columbia, are recognizable and insightful. I
especially enjoyed Mambo Sauce, in which a
black woman who moved from Brooklyn
interacted with the owners and patrons of a
neighborhood food joint. The contrast
between how Constance and her white
boyfriend approached the mambo sauce and
the restaurant was perfect. Short stories can
leave some readers wanting more exposition,
but I found in each of these stories, Acker gets
the genre just right: we glimpse into the lives
of people we recognize and the ways in which
they behave tell us something about human
nature.
Places and Names:
On War,
Revolution, and
Returning
Ackerman, Elliot
Release Date: 6/11/19
Waiting for Eden
Ackerman, Elliot
1/22/19
Intensity. Readers who enjoy finely written
literary fiction are those most likely to enjoy
Elliot Ackerman’s novel titled, Waiting for
Eden. Protagonist Eden survived an explosion
in Iraq and is at a Texas burn center thanks to
the efforts of medical personnel who saved his
life. What’s left of Eden weighs 70 pounds,
down from his normal 220. Eden’s distinction
is that his were the worst wounds of the wars
in Iraq and Afghanistan that didn’t
immediately end in death. Eden’s wife Mary
has spent three years at his bedside waiting
for him to communicate, heal or die. The
narrator is a ghost: Eden’s best friend who
died in that blast in Iraq, who is also waiting
for Eden to join him in death. These three
characters are complex, and Ackerman
develops them with depth. From the
beginning to the end of the novel, Ackerman
maintains an intensity while he develops
multiple levels of meaning and explores issues
of loyalty, suffering and betrayal.
Dominion: The
History of England
from the Battle of
Waterloo to
Victoria's
Diamond Jubilee
Ackroyd, Peter
Shelf of Ennui 2019.
Hardly Children
Adamczyk, Laura
Release Date: 11/20/18
Children of Virtue
and Vengeance
Adeyemi, Tomi
Release Date: 12/3/19
The Coronation
Akunin, Boris
3/6/19
Abduction. I like to read entertaining
mystery novels, especially those that keep me
guessing long into the narrative. The first
novel I’ve read by Boris Akunin is titled, The
Coronation, and features a recurring
protagonist and private investigator, Erast
Petrovich Fandorin. The four-year-old son of
a Grand Duke has been abducted shortly
before the coronation of Tsar Nicholas II.
Ransom requests for royal jewels, including
ones that would be visible at the coronation
add to the urgency of finding the boy.
Fandorin uses great skills at disguise and
assimilation with criminals to try to solve the
crime. Akunin develops the characters with
skill and keeps the plot momentum at a fast
pace. Readers who enjoy mysteries, especially
in a historical setting, are those most likely to
enjoy this novel.
The Hazel Wood
Albert, Melissa
Release Date: 1/30/18
Bad Stories
Almond, Steve
Release Date: 4/1/18
William Stoner
and the Battle for
the Inner Life
Almond, Steve
Release Date: 6/18/19
Welfare
Anwyll, Steve
Release Date: 1/8/19
Amazing Things
Are Happening
Here
Appel, Jacob M.
Release Date: 4/15/19
The Lies That Bind
Appiah, Kwame
Anthony
4/19/19
Identity. Kwame Anthony Appiah offers a
framework for thinking about identity in his
book titled, The Lies That Bind. Many readers
will find assumptions challenged about how
identities work. Appiah reveals how our
assumptions have been forged, whether as a
consequence of conflict, or a result of poor
science. Our differences are not as great as we
may think they are, no matter how we define
“we.” There are great stories and clear
thinking on these pages. Any reader who
enjoys philosophy written for a general
audience will likely appreciate this book.